Mattr Invites Influencers to Advisory Committee to Help Shape its Platform

Since our inception in 2012, Mattr has provided brands with the high level, psychographic data they need to identify and connect with social media savvy individuals. With the introduction of Virtual Agent, we helped brands hire influencers they identified directly through the Mattr app, providing an end-to-end influencer marketing platform. Now, in an effort to continue improving our software, Mattr has formed an Advisory Committee of influencers pulled straight from our app, to help provide guidance and insights that can be used to build an even better experience between influencers and brands. Building a Diverse Advisory Committee Our Advisory Committee is comprised of various influencers from unique backgrounds- including travelers, mommy bloggers, and more- each bringing their own unique perspective to the discussion. In choosing potential committee members, we selected individuals with proven high engagement on social, while also concentrating on diversity so a range of opinions and feedback could be uncovered. Some of the selected influencers already have deep experience working with brands on sponsored influencer campaigns, while others are planning to do so for the first time with the help of the our platform. The end result of the committee will be a well-rounded, credible and ongoing assessment that can be applied to the Mattr technology. As we expand our influencer marketing platform, advisory committee members will be the first to navigate the technology and provide feedback on all its features. Suggestions will be incorporated into its development schedule, which will then be followed by another assessment period conducted by members to ensure efficiency and simplicity of the platform. As the first in line to receive industry information, members...

Brand Laryngitis: Losing Your Voice to Millennials

By Jack Holt, Mattr CEO It’s not much of a secret anymore: Kids don’t trust what brands tell them. Think back to your teenage years — when your parents told you to do whatever. (You’re the parent in this scenario, by the way.) Why is this so different? Because by 2020, those kids — millennials and Gen Zs — will spend $200 billion in the US. Also by 2020, Gen Zs, (kids born after 2000), will comprise 40% of our economy (source: Nielsen). So if you’re counting on digital, social, or TV ads to get your message through to consumers, you’re liable to be shifting uncomfortably in your seat when presenting to the CMO. But you have messages to get to your consumers, and budget. And now you’ve resigned yourself to the eventuality that you have to use a different voice than yours. What will you do? There are some effective strategies emerging but let’s look at some current ones.   Native Advertising Budgets for native blew up last year. The Daily Beast saw a 50% increase in brand requests for native ads from 2014–2015. You’ve surely seen these articles or videos thinly disguised as editorial content. Maybe they are labeled, “sponsored content”. Regardless, the “savvy-cynicals” have already stopped clicking. A survey by Trusted Media Brands found a small reduction of brands planning to use native this year. Are they just tapping the brakes? Doubtful. Track Maven found that, although brands increased these ads by 78% in 2013–14, interactions declined 60%. Your target audience is desperately seeking authenticity and native content is a big Authenticity-Hole. Because you’re trying to trick them, doing your brand more...

Real Talk: Influencer Relationships Beyond the Campaign

In our Real Talk series, we’ve guided you through the many stages of working with influencers for a campaign: including analyzing and choosing influencers, creating your campaign, conveying your brand, and making changes during a campaign. In this final installment, we discuss what happens after the campaign ends. While the campaign is still fresh in your memory, you should document your experience with each influencer. Save the feedback and the results they drove for your brand. It may even be helpful to record a score for each that you keep in your records. If you do a campaign in the future and want to consider using some of the same influencers, you want to have an indication of your experience with them. If you run many paid influencer campaigns, the more documentation you keep, the better. Next, provide feedback to the influencers you worked with. This is good for you because you may want to work with them again, and it’s beneficial for them because it helps them learn from the experience. This is especially valid if they’re relatively new to being a paid influencer. They may want to work with additional companies in the future as an influencer and your feedback could help them refine their content and approach. Focus your feedback on three areas: The quality of their content (uniqueness, alignment with your brand/campaign, reception by their followers) Their efforts to drive more from their content (engagement, sharing, etc.) How well they operated within the parameters of the campaign In each area, tell them what they did well and what they could improve in the future. Make sure you’re...

Real Talk: Overcoming Obstacles During an Influencer Campaign

Our last installment of the Real Talk series focused on helping your influencers understand your brand messages, while also spreading the word via their own personal style. Picking up at where we left off, you’ve now provided the influencers with your brand’s message pillars and given them the guidance to use their creative freedom to spread the word. So what’s next? – actually executing the campaign. This is a crucial point of your relationship with your influencers. You can’t look at the campaign with a set it and forget it attitude. Using influencers can reduce the time on your plate usually associated with content creation during a campaign, but it doesn’t mean you aren’t involved with the execution. You must be readily available to your chosen influencers every step of the way – including during the entire duration of the campaign. Throughout the course of a campaign things often don’t go as planned. It’s likely that a situation will arise in which the influencer will need assistance. Someone from your team should be ready to engage with them when and if they have questions. Influencers can range from highly experienced to first-timers, but no matter their experience level, situations can arise where you must be ready to jump in to help them, guide them, and sometimes even solve a problem. Here are some common situations that you could run into: BRAND Obstacle: stay relevant At times, your brand may have fluctuations in the quality, functionality, service, or style of the product/service influencers are promoting or representing during the campaign. Being that your influencers are in essence your brand ambassadors, they should...

Real Talk: Helping Influencers Understand Your Brand Messages & How to Personalize Them

Every brand has its own way of talking. Certain words or phrases may be used while others are actively avoided. Statements could be simple and direct or full of imagery and emotion. Tone might be educational and helpful or sarcastic and humorous. A brand’s talking style differs greatly from one to the next, but on top of the style, every brand also has certain brand messages that emphasize its product or services, competitive advantages and experience. Altogether, there’s a lot that goes into how a brand presents itself. When you work with influencers, it’s important that they understand your brand messages and style. Your instinct may be to approach this task the same way you would when educating marketing employees and agencies on your brand, but the two scenarios are very different. While it might make sense to provide your ad agency with a Brand Style Guide, doing so with influencers would probably be overkill, so much so that some may even question working with you. Remember, influencers have their own unique voice, much like your brand. The value for you in working with them is derived from that voice they’ve already formed. It’s that voice that led them to become an influencer and accumulate followers who value their opinion. The worst thing you can do is try and force your brand on them so much that their voice is minimized. You want to tap into their network positively, not have it appear as if they’re simply a hired shill. So how do you maximize the voice of your influencers? Prioritization. It’s helpful to give a booklet or document...