Cultivate the Most Engaged Audiences Through Mid and Micro Influencers

Though the number of brands creating formalized influencer marketing programs has increased greatly over the past few years, it’s not really a new function if you think about. In its purest form, it’s been done for years and years. Brands just didn’t play such a significant role. Think about it. Since products and services first started to be sold, buyers have looked for information and recommendations from people other than the brands offering the products and services. Family, friends and celebrities (before celebrity endorsers became a thing) were all the earliest form of influencers. Everyone is Influential Today, influencer marketing has transformed into something much more expansive, yet also much more specific. Influence is now virtually everywhere – in person, on TV, on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, Pinterest, Facebook, and the list goes on and on. Yet it’s gotten much more specific because of mid-level and micro influencers who talk about a niche genre and have a niche audience. Let’s take, for example, a travel blogger. This person has real credibility and experience. It isn’t just your aunt or friend recommending a vacation destination because they enjoyed a trip there. A travel blogger has been all over the world and can provide recommendations based on specific criteria – budget, length of trip, cultural experience, cuisine, etc. While macro-influencers or celebrity endorsers can and do bring ROI for some brands, more and more companies are looking to work with mid-level and micro influencers because of the relationships they have and the personal engagement they maintain with their audience on a consistent basis. Brands are finding that they can gain more...

When to Cut Ties With an Influencer

You’ve put lots of time, effort and resources into finding influencers to work with on your campaign. You’ve educated them on your brand and goals, given them assets and answered all the questions they have. After the campaign is up and running, it’s smooth sailing. Everything is going well. They’re bringing people to your website or improving clicks or whatever your objectives are. But then it happens – they do something… Maybe that something just makes you a little uncomfortable, but maybe it goes further and makes you cringe. It may not even be something they did that directly relates to your brand. It could be something they did in their personal life. Sometimes, even after you thoroughly research into their past actions online and personal values to make sure they align with your brands, an influencer will do something that could have a negative impact on your brand. At that point, you have to make the decision – do you stick with the influencer or cut ties and end the relationship? This was a decision previously facing Speedo, Ralph Lauren, Gentle Hair Removal and Airweave, following swimmer Ryan Lochte’s actions in Rio de Janeiro during the Olympic Games. After Lochte and three fellow swimmers kicked in a gas station bathroom door and then filed a false report claiming they were robbed at gunpoint, the four brands had to decide if they would stick with him as an endorser. Ultimately all four made the decision to end their relationships with Lochte. Now you might be thinking that the situation is different because he’s a celebrity endorser with a large following,...
What Facebook’s War on Ad Blockers Signals for Digital

What Facebook’s War on Ad Blockers Signals for Digital

By Jack Holt, Mattr CEO (Originally posted on Medium) Recently the New Yorker reported on Facebook’s real reason for ending the peace between ad blockers and publishers. But instead of a crushing, Soviet-like strategic salvo, this latest offensive in the war on consumer happiness is more like a roll-up play in Senior and Assisted Living properties. On second thought, maybe it is very Soviet-like; it’s one big place where the brand voice will go to die. The News: Apple’s mobile ad blockers, which have earned a lot of attention, work only on Safari’s mobile browser. But Apple’s entire mobile platform is built on closed-system apps, not Web-based sites. Ads served within these apps cannot be blocked by anything, not even Apple’s own ad blockers. And the Payoff: It’s not a coincidence, either, that Apple makes money from apps through both sales and advertising, while it earns nothing from its mobile browser. But publishers, even those with enormous resources such as Facebook, can’t keep this up much longer: Youngs do not trust the brand voice. Click-throughs depend on some constant of this trust to achieve their dismal yield. Reference Andrew Chen’s famous “Law of Shitty Clickthroughs” which hypothesizes that, once a new platform or tricky ad tactic loses its novelty, others show up to pump the click-through percentage back up, in a never-ending cycle. But Chen’s hypothesis assumes that next generations of consumers will behave as did the previous. That the variable of brand-voice trust will remain constant. As they say, “history repeats itself — but never in the same way.” Accordingly, new technology, that unknown responsible for continental shifts in our behavior/society,...
Podcast: Show Me the Data with Matt Mullican

Podcast: Show Me the Data with Matt Mullican

http://feeds.soundcloud.com/stream/271672785-and-it-is-amazing-show-me-the-data-with-matt-mullican.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download Host: Kyle Leach, Mattr Guest: Matt Mullican, Data Scientist at Mattr Show Me the Data Behind the Influencers In Episode 3 of our ‘And It Is Amazing’ podcast, Matt Mullican discusses the data behind the best online influencers. He shares compelling info and quantifiable metrics pulled from the top-engaged travel influencers in the Mattr app. He points out that the data team at Mattr processes and analyzes over 15 million social posts a day to accurately measure these unique metrics, including engagement metrics.   “The top engaged posts rarely repurpose content taken from other channels or other influencers.”   In this episode, Matt shares: The quantifiable metrics Mattr analyzes and discovers about an influencer, including when they’re most active and their top interests What commonalities Mattr sees in the top-engaged posts of the top travel influencers Engagement anlyses and observations for macro, mid and micro influencers Why as an influencer, you would want to actively engage with followers, simply provide content to them, or both– in order to increase your engagement Running time 5:13 Be sure to subscribe to us and review us on...
Reach Does Not Determine an Influencer’s Worth

Reach Does Not Determine an Influencer’s Worth

Last month, an article was published on AdWeek about the worth of influencers’ social posts. It focused largely on female celebrities, mentioning that the top six influencers currently are Selena Gomez, Rihanna, Beyonce, Taylor Swift, and Kendall and Kylie Jenner. These six women were deemed the top influencers by D’Marie Analytics, a social measurement company, which also found Gomez to be the most influential, with individual social posts worth up to $550,000 each. That’s right. One 140-character tweet or one Instagram selfie from Gomez could cost a brand a whopping $550,000. Where did the $550,000 figure come from? Frank Spadafora, CEO of D’Marie Analytics describes the methodology: “This valuation is based on D’Marie’s algorithm which measures 56 metrics including followers, post frequency, engagement, quality of post, click-thru and potential to create sales conversions from her social content.” Applying 56 metrics to the figure seems like sound reasoning. That’s a lot of data! But is it the right data? We’re curious how much weight was placed on follower count. If it’s heavily weighted, then it makes sense that the six celebs would be considered top influencers. After all, someone with an extremely high follower count definitely has the reach to claim influence. However, a high follower count does not necessarily mean more engagement or more click thrus. In fact, the more trust and authenticity that is shown to an audience, the more potential there is for sales conversion. It could be argued that big name celebrities, whom regular people don’t always view with trust and authenticity, don’t necessarily increase the likelihood of sales conversions. And are celebrity followers qualified leads?...